Sharing innovation to inspire action

Healthcare

post-image

Healthcare

A gel that can help heal tooth decay
Recently in China, a team of scientists have developed a gel that can regrow tooth enamel. Tooth enamel is the hard, outer surface layer of your teeth that serves to protect against tooth decay. Usually, teeth enamel cannot grow back once it breaks or wears away due to its complicated structure covering the surface of a tooth. It is formed biologically and can therefore cannot be self-repaired, increasing the chances of cavities. However, with the new gel it is great because it is made of the same material as enamel, consisting of calcium and phosphate ions. https://www.intelligentliving.co/scientists-develop-gel-regrow-tooth-enamel/
16th September 2019 by shaina-barraga 0 Comments
(0 vote(s), average 0 out of 5)
post-image

Healthcare

Artificial leaves that can turn sunlight into medicine
Like actual leaves, the artificial leaves take in sunlight and use it to create something entirely new, only instead of generating fuel for a living plant, they can produce medicine for humans. When sunlight hits certain liquids flowing through the leaves it sparks a chemical reaction. This is a process that would normally require electric power, harsh chemicals, or both, but by using sunlight to power the medicine production, it becomes much more sustainable. https://bgr.com/2019/09/10/artificial-leaf-study-solar-power-medicine/
12th September 2019 by IdeaSpies Admin 0 Comments
(0 vote(s), average 0 out of 5)
post-image

Healthcare

Using machine learning for drug development
AstraZeneca will partner with Schr?dinger to use the company's advanced computing platform to accelerate drug discovery efforts. Work conducted by AstraZeneca's medicinal and computational chemists will be used by Schr?dinger's computational platform to improve the design of compounds. In turn, this will identify potential new therapeutic candidates. Machine learning systematically analyses data to find connections with the artificial intelligence used to deduce previously unknown connections. Results are then used to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease and the compounds that can treat them. https://www.biospace.com/article/astrazeneca-bolsters-machine-learning-use-for-drug-development-with-schro
9th September 2019 by mel 0 Comments
(0 vote(s), average 0 out of 5)
post-image

Healthcare

Robotic tail providing humans with advanced motor capabilities
Researchers from the Keio University in Tokyo have developed an artificial biomimicry-inspired tail capable of extending the human?s innate body functions. The appendage which predominantly enhances the user?s balance and strength could provide a multitude of benefits to various industries, including physically intensive occupations such as construction work, whereby the tail?s additional support could improve worker safety. Patients recovering from neurological or orthopedic injuries could also use the tail for rehabilitative purposes. However, this new technology currently has limitations in terms of its portability and accessibility. More information: https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/robotic-tail-gives-humans-key-abilities-evolut
4th September 2019 by nathanc 0 Comments
(0 vote(s), average 0 out of 5)
post-image

Healthcare

Prevent brain damage with High-Tech Football Helmet
This special equipment aims to better mitigate the long-term effects of concussions and hits to the head. One of the most remarkable features of the new High-Tech Football Helmet is the presence of sensors in the helmet. These devices automatically record head impacts and signal to the sideline staff when major hits happen during a game.
4th September 2019 by kevinnghiem 0 Comments
(0 vote(s), average 0 out of 5)
post-image

Healthcare

A new way to manage your pain by tracking it
Pain ROADMAP is a mobile platform made up of an app for patients with chronic pain and a portal for clinicians. Using the app, you can keep a log of each activity you do throughout the day, your pain levels as you do those activities, what pain medication you take and when. You also wear a device around your waist, which keeps track of when you are moving and resting. Armed with this detailed information, clinicians can help you work out how to better pace your activities through the day to reduce the frequency of intense periods of pain. By using ROADMAP five out of seven people who relied on take-as-needed pain medication were able to stop taking it according to a study. Opioid medication by those in the study also decreased by 20 per cent on average. https://blog.csiro.au/managing-chronic-pain-in-more-mobile-ways/
31st August 2019 by IdeaSpies Admin 0 Comments
(0 vote(s), average 0 out of 5)